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Carlo Purassanta. More information means more awareness, for those who produce and for those who consume

Innovation / -

Technology will enable higher quality and more sustainability in production, thanks especially to the Internet of Things. So says the CEO of Microsoft Italia, the multinational company which in Expo Milano 2015 has ‘accelerated’ ten start-up companies and involved 100 innovators in focusing on the issues treated in the Milan Charter.

Speaking to ExpoNet, Carlo Purassanta, CEO of Microsoft Italia, summed up and assessed the company’s experiences during the six months of the Universal Exposition, during which it has accelerated ten food start-ups and put 100 innovators in contact with each other to focus on the key issues contained in the Milan Charter.
 
“We’re extremely satisfied with the work carried out in Expo Milano 2015: a wonderful experience, as we can see from the number of young people who pass through here every day, a huge success,” commented Purassanta. “We have placed the accent on innovative start-ups, and in collaboration with the USA Pavilion we selected ten which we accelerated. The aspects which interest us most are quality production through precision farming, which makes it possible to optimize the yield of specific terrains and territories, and also the relationship with the consumer, i.e. how to provide the consumer with information which enhances their level of awareness of food products. The technology which is creating the most curiosity is the Internet of Things, which enables more information to be supplied to both the consumer and the farmer.
 
#sparkthemilancharter stimulates 100 innovators to share ideas and collaborate
Another major contribution from Microsoft Italia directly regarded the Milan Charter, through the #sparkthemilancharter event, which involved roughly 100 innovators of all ages and nationalities in working on concrete technological contents for the active application of the principles contained in the Charter.
 

Ninth trend: 3D printing

Innovation / -

 
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ARCOLABIO


NATURAL MACHINES


BOCUSINI


SMART GASTRONOMIA LAB

The spread of 3D printer technology is a fascinating phenomenon, which is starting to be employed in restaurants and even in private homes. This is basically a more sophisticated version of the home-made auto-production approach, made ‘smarter’ by the use of this new technology.

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Tomato Sushi. To save ahi tuna, all you need is a tomato

Innovation / -

tomato sushi startup intervista

Environmentally friendly, it keeps the taste consumers love and opens up a whole new market. James Corwell has created Tomato Sushi, a product that replaces fish with a vegetarian option.

We asked James Corwell, a top American chef and member of the American Federation of “Certified Master Chefs”, to answer our questions on his startup. His innovative idea made him market leader, thanks also to the funding received via crowdfunding on Kickstarter.
 
How did the idea of Tomato Sushi begin?
It all began while I was teaching at the Culinary Institute of America. I had the opportunity to go and work in Japan for a short period and I was given the chance to visit the largest fish market in the world. It was an impressive sight seeing how an impressive volume of ahi tuna measuring two football fields was auctioned by 10:00 in the morning five days a week all year round. Eating other types of tune doesn’t resolve the problem. It simply passes it on to another species. So I began to work on transforming tomatoes with other salty ingredients to obtain a product that looks like tuna, but is prepared using other traditional Japanese ingredients and, once combined with rice, looks like sushi.
 
We asked James Corwell, a top American chef and member of the American Federation of “Certified Master Chefs”, to answer our questions on his startup. His innovative idea made him market leader, thanks also to the funding received via crowdfunding on Kickstarter.
 
How did the idea of Tomato Sushi begin?
It all began while I was teaching at the Culinary Institute of America. I had the opportunity to go and work in Japan for a short period and I was given the chance to visit the largest fish market in the world. It was an impressive sight seeing how an impressive volume of ahi tuna measuring two football fields was auctioned by 10:00 in the morning five days a week all year round. Eating other types of tune doesn’t resolve the problem. It simply passes it on to another species. So I began to work on transforming tomatoes with other salty ingredients to obtain a product that looks like tuna, but is prepared using other traditional Japanese ingredients and, once combined with rice, looks like sushi.
 
 
How many partners and employees do you have? What is your target segment?
I am the sole owner. I employ between 4 and 12 people on our premises, depending on the sales volume. We target sushi lovers. We also market to the Vegan public, although I have always wanted our products to be thought to share something in common with the traditional sushi dish.
 
Can you briefly sum up your geographic reach?
Basically, we sell and deliver within the San Francisco and New York areas, but we are working on extending to Canada and the European Union.
 
What are your medium-term economic objectives? What is your competitive advantage on the market?
We are seeking to increase our distribution. We can become leader in the United States by mid 2015. The fact that we were the first on the market helps. The process has been patented and it is a niche business. At this point, we have to try and keep our largest competitors out of the picture. Even though I believe there will be other competitors in the future.
 
 
 

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