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Cured meats

Salumi

Cured meats
 
Place of production
Lombardy – Brianza and part of the provinces of Milan, Como and Lecco.
This area is characterised by a typically hilly climate, balanced by the proximity of the lake and shielded by the Alpine foothills, which is ideal for the production of cured meats.
 
Product description
Brianza Salami is produced exclusively from pork with the addition of salt and pepper – ground or granulated – and in some cases, wine. The filling is ground according to the size of the salami: a finer grain is required for smaller types and a slightly larger grain for bigger sizes. It is packed into natural gut or artificial casings, and may be tied with twine or netted. The curing period can vary between 3 and 15 weeks depending on the size.
Two different sizes are available:
- maximum weight of 300 g after curing and milled to 4-4.5 mm (fine ground)
- weight over 300 g after curing and milled to 7-8 mm (coarse ground).
In both cases the filling has a ruby red colour and tends towards leanness, with broken peppercorns; when sliced it is uniform and consistent with a compact appearance. The aroma is delicate and distinctive; the flavour is very sweet and never pungent.

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History / Traditions / Interesting Facts
Pig rearing has been practised all over the territory of Lombardy since Roman times. The development of the first techniques for the processing and preservation of pig meat is owed to the Gallic populations residing in the area. The production of cured meats itself dates back to the Lombard era; its methods were later refined by monastic orders, who promoted norcineria also for medical and therapeutic reasons.
It was then in the late Middle Ages that typical geographical areas for the production of cured meats began to be identified. The particular climate of Brianza, attenuated by the proximity of the lake and shielded to the North by the Alpine foothills, was ideal for drying, curing and storage of pig meat and made these green hills the cradle of a particularly tasty salami.
The proximity of the city of Milan contributed to the sudden popularity of the product outside of its area of origin; as a result production has increased significantly in the last two centuries. Today in the area there are several medium-size cured meats industries, operating at a high level of quality in keeping with tradition.
In 1978, at the behest of some manufacturers, the Consortium of Brianza Salami was formed, with the aim of preserving and protecting the characteristics and authenticity of the product; on 12 June 1976 Brianza Salami obtained DOP certification and registration.
 
Contact information
Consorzio Salame Brianza
Via Bergamo, 35 - 23807 Merate (Lecco)
T+39 039 9909577 –  F+39 039 9909851 

For more information
www.consorziosalamebrianza.it
 
 
 
Cured meats
 
Place of production
San Daniele del Friuli (Udine)

Product description
San Daniele ham has three outstanding characteristics: in the first place, only legs from pigs born, bred and slaughtered in ten regions of central-northern Italy are used to make it; secondly, the production process is based on an ancient tradition, which now follows the strict standards of DOP production. It is also strictly forbidden to freeze the meat, so the fresh pork legs must reach the city rapidly for processing with sea salt, without any chemical additives or preservatives. Lastly, the ham may only be made in San Daniele del Friuli, where the ideal micro-climate to age it is reproduced: here, where humidity and temperature are regulated by the lands of the Morainic Hills and the waters of the Tagliamento River, the fresh currents from the Carnic Alps meet the humid currents from the Adriatic Sea, leading to a combination of resinous and briny fragrances which give San Daniele a unique and inimitable flavour.

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History / Traditions / Interesting Facts
San Daniele and its ham date back many centuries: as early as the Pre-Roman era, the ancient peoples were already experimenting with the unusual climatic conditions (low humidity and good ventilation) characteristic of the hills in this area of the Friuli region. The Romans knew the ham well, but the first written testimony dates to the Middle Ages and is found principally in the documents of the Community and Council of Arengo (the council of the heads of the leading families) of the city. The ham is cited often in the deeds called “I Quaderni dei Giurati”, copied by the Amanuensis starting from 1200, which confirm the importance of the product, used as a means of payment and precious gift, during those years. Throughout the feudal period, ham on the bone, now considered a delicacy, was traded between the city and the feudal potentates of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. In more recent history, San Daniele ham has acquired the renown and status of a typical product and has been indicated with this name since 1800.
The first ham factories opened in the ’1920s: the cellar was transformed from a part of the home to a genuine place of production and business. By the end of the ’1940s, ham making was an industry and several companies developed from the 1960s onwards to the extent that they contributed to creation of a national and international cured ham market.

Contact information 
Consorzio del Prosciutto di San Daniele
Via Umberto I 26 – 33038 San Daniele del Friuli (Udine)
Tel +39 0432 957515
info@prosciuttosandaniele.it
 
For more information
www.prosciuttosandaniele.it

News and events
Scent of Friuli Venezia Giulia 26-29 June 2015
 
 
 
Cured meats
 
Place of production
Emilia Romagna
 
Product description
The cured meats of Emilia Romagna are among the best known in the world and are one of the most prized icons of the "Made in Italy" label and of the region itself.
Parma DOP Ham. The ham is produced from heavily matured pork leg. Round in shape, it weighs between 8 and 10 kg, and no less than 7.
Zibello DOP Culatello. Naturally matured, to be kept raw, after the maturing period the finished product has a characteristic pear shape with a thin layer of fat on the rounded side. Twine is then spiralled around it to form a distinctive loose-knit net.
Bologna IGP Mortadella. Mortadella is made from striated pork muscle and small cubes of fat taken exclusively from the neck of the pig. The product is usually oval or cylindrical in shape, it is wrapped in a natural or synthetic casing and cooked for several hours.
Felino IGP Salami. A raw, matured product that is made from processing choice cuts of high-quality pork meat. The cuts of meat are made up of fragments of fat and muscle (from the forward part of the belly and/or chuck).

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History / Traditions / Interesting Facts
Parma Ham. 2000 years of history bear witness to the success of Parma ham: Cato the Elder, Strabo and Polybius wrote of pig farms and salted legs of pork. An epigraph displayed in the Capitoline Museums lists the menu of the day as pullum (chicken), piscem (fish) and perna (ham). The Italian word for ham, 'prosciutto' (from the Latin perexsuctum, meaning "dried"), is indicative of its ancient slow maturation process.
Zibello Culatello. Originating on the banks of the river Po, the production of culatello is closely linked to the local climate. It is produced in winter, taking advantage of the fog and the cold weather. Hence the local saying “we hope it is going to be foggy…”, because it takes winter humidity, still air and strong summer heat to achieve perfect ageing. Traditionally, every family of Parma, even the poorest, would raise a pig, feeding it with scraps from the kitchen. From this pig they would get two culatellos, but they were almost never eaten. One of them would often be used to repay debts and favours, and the other one to buy a young pig, to repeat the process the following year.
Mortadella. The most renowned cured meat of the Bologna tradition and often called 'La Bologna'. The word 'mortadella' has several possible origins: from the Latin murtatum, meaning "sausage seasoned with myrtle" (myrtum), or from the Late Latin mortarium, the mortar in which the monks of Bologna–who are said to have first created the sausage–would pound the paste of meat mixed with fat and spices.
Felino Salami. The oldest representation of the product appears to be in the interior decoration of the Baptistery of Parma (1196–1307). From 1800, a distinctive method of processing the pork into salami was used in the small town of Felino. Then in 1905, the expression 'Salume Felino' (Felino Salami) appears in Italian dictionaries for the first time.
 
Contact information 
Consorzio del Prosciutto di Parma
Largo Calamandrei, 1/A - 43100 Parma
T +39 0521 246211
F +39 0521 243983
info@prosciuttodiparma.com
 
Consorzio per la tutela del culatello di Zibello
Piazza Garibaldi, 34 - 43010 Zibello (Parma)
T+39 0524 99131
F +39 0524 939100
info@consorziodituteladelculatellodizibello.com
 
Consorzio Mortadella Bologna
Str. 4, palazzo Q8, Milano Fiori - 20089 Rozzano (Milano)
T + 39 02 8925901
F +39 02 57510667
infom@mortadellabologna.com
 
Consorzio di Tutela del Salame Felino IGP
Strada al Ponte Caprazucca, 6/a - Parma
T +39 0521 2266
F +39 0521 226700
info@salamefelino.com
 
 
 
Cured meats
 
Place of production
Entire region: in particular the municipalities of Norcia, Preci, Cascia, Monteleone di Spoleto and Poggiodomo
 
Product description
Of all the gastronomic specialities of Umbria, the salami products perfectly represent the spirit and the art of good eating. Among them, Norcia IGP ham stands out: made from heavy adult pig haunches in the mountainous regions of the production area, it has the usual rounded pear shape and is classified as a mountain ham, with a standard minimum weight of 8.5 kg; when sliced, it has a pinkish to red colour with a savoury but not salty aroma and taste; the smell is distinctive and has a slightly spicy edge due to the small quantities of pepper used. Processing begins with the salting of the ham, carried out twice using medium grain sea salt. Curing takes place in rooms equipped with air exchange systems. The period from salting to marketing is not less than 12 months.
Charcuterie products also include salami from Norcia (corallina) and capocollo. And then, from the Slow Food Presidium of the upper Tiber Valley, there is the Mazzafegato sausage prepared with the "red", blood-rich parts of the pig – parts which would otherwise not be used (liver, heart, lung and scraps left over from other sausages, hence the name, which means "liver-killer"). This product is strongly linked to the home-prepared norcineria tradition.

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History / Traditions / Interesting Facts
Norcia, the traditional production area of Norcia IGP ham, is the very place that gave birth to the most skilled experts in butchering pigs for the preparation of salami, aptly known as "norcini". In the Nursine area, the technique of pork curing dates back to Roman times, when farming and livestock rearing was a widespread practice in the area. The introduction of pork curing allowed for rational and efficient land usage even in the coldest times of the year. For this reason, during the period of the Roman Republic and Empire, policies were implemented for the countryside development of this area of central Italy. The Papal States later supported these measures. Over time, therefore, farmers in these areas became adept and experienced in the processing and preservation of pork, which was sold, salted and cured in neighbouring areas. A respect for tradition that has come down to our own times, and that was clearly evidenced when the Slow Food Mazzafegato Presidium brought together 8 producers driven by the desire to rehabilitate this product. The mazzafegato had been in danger of disappearing altogether, having been unable to maintain a sufficient number of customers attuned to its complex flavours.
 
Contact information
Consorzio di tutela dell'IGP Prosciutto di Norcia

Via Solferino, 26
06046- Norcia (Perugia)
E-mail: info@prosciuttodinorcia.com
 
Fondazione Slow Food per la Biodiversità Onlus
Via Mendicità Istruita, 14
12042 Bra (Cuneo)
infopresidi@slowfood.it
tel. +39 0172 419611
fax. +39 0172 421293
 
 
 
Cured meats
 
Place of production
The town of Carpegna only (Pesaro and Urbino).
 
Product description
Produced from pigs reared and slaughtered exclusively in Marche, Emilia Romagna and Lombardy, aged at least 10 months and with an average weight of 160 kg. To get the special sweet taste of Carpegna, the pig haunches, once thoroughly salted, washed and trimmed, are coated with a special fat that protects the surface during the maturation period. Once the ageing process is complete, the sliced Carpegna has a nice pinkish colour and will normally be bordered by a moderate amount of white fat, which gives the ham most of its sweetness and soft and mellow texture. Seasoning is never less than 8 months, and the whole curing process takes a minimum of 12 months (14 on average).

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History / Traditions / Interesting Facts
The first written references to Carpegna ham go back to 1463, when the lord of Cesena, Malatesta Novello, sold the important Cervia salt flats to the Serenissima Republic of Venice but retained rights of use, so as to allow the salting of the hams. But the tradition of ham production in the area dates back even further to when Carpegna was a 'vicus', or neighbourhood, of the nearby Roman town of Pitinum Pisaurense: the territory had always been abundant in forests, mostly oak, which was a key food source in pig rearing. And even more ancient is the tradition of rearing and preserving pig meat; the practice dates back to the Senon Gaul tribes, who, before the arrival of the Romans, had occupied the territory of Carpegna for centuries.
 
Contact information
Region of Marche Programme for Tourism
Via Gentile da Fabriano, 9 Ancona
 
 
News and events
Festival of Carpegna Ham DOP - Carpegna (mid-July)
http://www.prolococarpegna.it/festa-del-prosciutto/
 
 
 
Cured meats
 
Place of production
Municipalities of Martina Franca (Taranto), Locorotondo (Bari) and Cisternino (Brindisi)
 
Product description
Capocollo of Martina Franca is a salami made from the meat of pigs born and raised on large farms in the area. It is made from the upper portion of the neck and part of the shoulder of the pig, suitably cleaned and shaped. The meat is salted, washed and marinated in mulled wine (local 'Martinese' white wine) with local herbs. The meat is then encased in pig gut and tied with natural twine. The sausage is then smoked using the bark of the Macedonian oak, almond husks and aromatic plants typical of the Mediterranean maquis shrubland. The sausage is then cured in a dry, well-ventilated environment for about three months. Capocollo of Martina Franca has an intense red-wine colour with a slight marbling of fat. It has a delicate taste with an aroma reflecting the spices and smoking process.

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History / Traditions / Interesting Facts
Known and prized throughout the Kingdom of Naples since the 18th century, capocollo of Martina Franca is the salami that best represents the ancient Martinese art of charcuterie. Known simply as “coppa” or “lonza” in other parts of Italy, the distinctive taste and smell of capocollo of Martina Franca sets it apart from other similar salamis. The artisan production process, handed down over centuries, the characteristics of the area, which is rich in woodland and aromatic Mediterranean maquis shrubland, together with the mild and airy conditions, come together to make this excellent Puglian product truly unique. Production is regulated by a strict set of standards, supervised by the Capocollo di Martina Franca Consortium and Slow Food Association.
 
Contact information
Luigi Scamarcio (Regione Puglia): l.scamarcio@regione.puglia.it
 
 
 
 
 
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